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Humans Are Not the Only Ones That Want to Feel Younger

We are all living in an age of infinite discovery. It seems every day we are reading about or watching some new innovation, with many having to do with technology and how they improve the “human” circumstance; but what about our dogs? The “fur-babies” who dog owners often refer to as members of their family, what about them? 

A quick search on Google or Amazon will reveal a plethora of devices from pet cameras to automatic feeders and apps that constantly connect their owners to their pets.

But what about longevity? Improving the actual health of your dog? What if our dogs could actually live longer than they have in past?

As our four-legged companions get on in their years, like us, their bodies begin to break down. The process of aging begins to settle in and words not yet spoken begin to be heard; arthritis, joint stiffness, and less energy begin to be observed and felt by our canine friends and their owners.

Recently, startling new discoveries in stem cell research is now producing viable options that could actually aid our senior dogs in having a more active and comfortable life as they get older.

Stem cells provide a way for the body to heal itself. Their ability to develop into different types of cells are what make them so biologically valuable. They can develop into muscle, nerve, bone, fat, or liver cells and more. Stem cells are essentially drawn to areas of the body where damaged tissues and cells are found and they work to repair those areas.

For dogs, scientists have discovered that within a dogs own body fat they have found dormant stem cells. These cells can be harvested, activated, and used for treatment often in the very same day.

As dogs age and begin to show signs of arthritis and other aging ailments, stem cells can be used to treat these conditions, giving our senior dogs a better quality of life, better range of motion, more energy, and less pain and stiffness as they get older. Many veterinarians are already actively involved in stem cell therapy with a reported 80-85% success rate.

Dogs have been part of our lives for thousands of years. The thought of helping the bodies of our dogs rebuild themselves sound too good to be true, … [but] it is quickly becoming a reality and I am overwhelmed with excitement to see what lays ahead.

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